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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the nickname of downtown scotty brown. then to law school, the army national guard, city and state political office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rar
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
. intercity passenger rail is already stimulating development on the corridor in cities like normal illinois where new multimodal station has attracted $200 million in related private investment and in joliet where construction of a new multi-mobile station is under way. plans also include new or improved stations were six other cities on backorder. we have greater 250 new jobs in rochelle illinois where rail cars are for california and the midwest are being built. last week i was able to witness -- that manufacture the notice to proceed. illinois in the midwest collaboration on high-speed rail began in 1980, but gained attractions in the '90s when a 10 state midwest regional -- regional rail initiative a joint study and prepared a stamp -- plan to upgrade existing track, and passenger rail frequencies and use new technologies to enable faster, safer passenger trains on all of our existing rail corridors. with years of solid planning in place, illinois and its midwest partners were ready to move quickly on april 16 in 2009 when president obama called for a national network of connected high-
of history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday on booktv on c-span2. and sunday at 5 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> we've had these explosionexplosion s of knowledge in madison. but we have not coordinated care, and all these services that we have independent so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. and you get to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all? i mean come on a global level what are we doing sometimes? and, of course, now we've got these reports saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary. step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the test was order, the procedures. this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently und
somebody that's about to set off a nuclear bomb in the middle of new york city or something like that, you know, in order to be compelling. well, you know, the argument is that if you use racial discrimination in college admissions, um, it's likely that there will be somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations among students and that the african-american kids and the latino kids, you know, who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is, just has overwhelming, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know,
in the great city of chicago at the knickerbocker hotel, he said. that was the hotel for officers. he said i would come into chicago and have a great time on the weekends and head back to the veterans hospital. well, he finally talked one of his fellow hawaiians, a man whose face had literally been burned off to join him on one of these trips to chicago. the man was embarrassed at his appearance and didn't think anyone would want to be around him or talk to him, but danny inouye made sure that when he came to chicago, he prepared all of these different places to stop. every one of them greeted senator inouye and his friend in a warm fashion. the story goes on from there, and i won't go into the details, but he was a man who always was looking to help someone else. he told how this man who had been so brutally injured in the war returned to hawaii and raised a family and was dan inouye's friend for life, as so many of us were. i think back as well about senator robert c. byrd's funeral in west virginia. mr. president, it was one of the hottest days i can remember. we were up there just baking
with two feet of snow and 60-mile-an-hour winds when a blizzard hammered the city. it caused 36 deaths, stranded 1,500 people on lake shore drive, which i go back and forth on every day and still find it hard to imagine, 1,500 people stuck on lake shore drive. it resulted in $3.9 billion in losses. april was the wettest april in 116 years in the midwest, forcing the mississippi and missouri rivers to flood thousands of square miles. this is 2011 i'm talking about. there were 326 tornadoes in may throughout the midwest and southern u.s., resulting in the deadliest may since 1933. wildfires burned 3 million acres of property across the western states, causing over a billion dollars in damages. and hurricane irene devastated the atlantic coast, causing $4.3 billion in damage. a very small amount compared to sandy but significant still for those affected. nationwide, the financial consequences of weather-related disasters and climate change hit an historic new high last year. u.s. disasters cost over $55 billion in damages. federal, state and local governments are paying out more every yea
violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and throughout the region, aqim we believe may now use its safe haven in northern mali to plan for regional or trans-national terrorist attacks. and just as we should not have ignored developments in afghanistan which seemed a remote and troubled country when the taliban took it over more than a dozen years ago, so, too, we would ignore the chaos in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has rec
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)